Tag Archives: #happyrunning

Trail running and racing Arizona

Something just felt right when I saw an ad for the Black Canyon 100k trail race.  I wanted to know what trail running in Arizona was like!  The photos looked amazing and it was a great time of year for escaping from the long winters of New Hampshire.  The skiing is fun but it is also nice to go somewhere warm and feel the sun on my skin.

Bumble Bee Arizona trails
Arizona Trails

Unfortunately a muscle tear in my hip area turned into a huge pile of adhesions and sidelined me since October.  I would get better, get worse, think I was healed and then realized I wasn’t.  I thought I was in the clear until we did a hike on very unstable snow and two weeks before the race I was hobbling around in pain again.  Being stubborn I went to the race and sadly dropped at mile 20.

It was motivation to finally fix this issue so I ruled out a stress fracture and saw two body work specialists where I experienced very painful massage, active release and dry needling along with chiropractic adjustments.  I am feeling incredible now and wish I had gone sooner, although if I had been able to run I would never have taken up skimo so if I could turn back the clock I would not change a thing!

Sunset in Bumblebee Arizona
Fun in the desert!
Mayer Arizona

Arizona, this is probably my absolute favorite trail running destination so far!  The race was in February and typically the temperatures are a bit warmer than we had but it was still wonderful!  Normal daytime temperatures are in the 60’s with the night dipping into low 40’s.  For us we had 30-40 degrees during the day, 20’s at night and a snowstorm (not typical)

Cold at the Grand Canyon

We camped at the Bumble Bee Ranch in Mayer,  Arizona.  They were very nice there and the camping was in a small area that had nice bathrooms and showers.  The race course literally passed by the camping area.  It was a great place to spend a couple of nights.

Ryan running some of the Black Canyon course

The race was absolutely fabulous!  Jamil Coury is the race director as well as the CEO for Aravaipa Running.  This race was flawless, perfectly marked trails, excellent pre race information, enthusiastic volunteers, fully stocked aid stations and an incredible vibe!  I actually enjoyed the race so much, even with a DNF that I plan to be back!

What is it like trail running in Arizona?  What kind of scary animals are there?  Is Arizona all desert, does it have trees?  What does it feel like to run into a cactus?
Trail by the ranch
Cuddling with the mountain lion at Bumble Bee Ranch

Running in the desert is fun, there are killer views the whole time due to the lack of trees.  The variety of cacti is really cool and the terrain is quite runnable.  There are some technical sections but they are not too bad if you are used to running on rocks.  The terrain is rolling and all runnable.  I found it to be a great way to run a faster pace than I am used to in the White Mountains.  I prefer running mountains but I also love to be able to stride out and feel my legs just go!

Hiking in Sedona

Scary animals…we did not see any but the biggest hazards are poisonous snakes, bears, mountain lions, scorpions, killer bees and other insects that pack a punch.  We saw absolutely none of these and honestly, the only thing that hurt me was running into a cactus and that was not even too bad.  Aside from the initial sting I had no idea that I had spines stuck in my leg until I felt something hanging off my leg and looked down.  Pulling them out hurt more than getting stuck with them.

Grand Canyon after the snow
The Grand Canyon South Rim
South Rim of the  Grand Canyon

Arizona was really unique because it had so much variety!  You could go to Flagstaff and run mountains (avalanche danger was very high so we did not tag the highpoint Humphreys Peak).  Flagstaff had trees, mountains, snow and felt like home.  Sedona had drier air and a mix of cacti, small trees and beautiful red rocks.

We also travelled to the South Rim of the Grand Canyon and went down a few miles in the snow storm.  It did end up clearing up and we had great views!  I loved dropping down in the canyon and wished we had more time to explore the area.  There were trees there and very cool rock features.  The Lake Powell area was very desolate and pretty in it’s own way.  I am not sure trail running here would be too pleasant due to very dry and sandy conditions.  There was almost no plant life here but there were neat landmarks such as Antelope Canyon and Horshoe Bend.

Antelope Canyon
Horshoe Bend

February is a tough time of year to find open campgrounds and showers were even harder to come by.  Unless you have an RV you are not welcome to shower in any of the year round campsites that offer showers.  The national park campsites do offer coin operated showers.  Expect to pay for a National Park Pass and a $35 campsite fee.  Your National Park pass is good for 7 days so you will use it if you plan to see some sights.

To our surprise truck stop showers were the best find!  For $12 you get to take a clean shower in a huge stall that you can lock the door and there is no time limit.  Ryan and I took turns showering and were able to both take a shower for the $12.  It was a bit sketchy but I would take a truck stop shower again!

Antelope Canyon
More antelope canyon

Do not expect to be alone if you are doing any of the popular attractions such as the canyons, Horshoe Bend, etc.  There were thousands of people, multiple tour busses and the bathrooms were so disgusting I preferred to “hold it” than use them.  Even grocery store and gas station bathrooms were a disaster in the areas that offered more tourist type attractions.

I know this is disgusting but every single toilet in the Lake Powell area including some of the campground ones looked like this. This is not okay.
Lake Powell

The cost of visiting Arizona was reasonable.  Camping ranged from $10-35 a night and they all had nice tent sites.  Food was very affordable with the exception of Sedona which was much more expensive (plan to pay between $25-60 for dinner).  Breakfast and lunch were very affordable as well (except for Sedona which ranged from $15-20).  Sedona was beautiful and worth checking out.  Due to the time of year only one campsite was open just outside of Sedona, during the peak season there are a lot more to pick from.  We stayed at Manzanita campground and it was perfect!

Ryan in Sedona
Sedona

Overall I would recommend visiting Arizona for a winter escape!  The trail running is fun and the vibe in Arizona is really laid back!  Don’t let the overdevelopment of Pheonix concern you when you land.  It is a city, just like any other major US City.  The airport is easy to get in and out of and you will have plenty of places to stay just outside of the airport.  

Sedona

Grand Canyon
The La Sportiva Lycan was the perfect shoe for running the trails in Arizona.  It offered plenty of support and cushion while maximizing traction.  The clothing was perfect for the variety of conditions we encountered!  My Julbo Aerolite sunglasses with Spectron 3 lenses kept my eyes shaded from the sun, they are light and comfortable.
Running part of the Black Canyon course in my Lycans!

We plan to check out other parts of Arizona the next time we visit and can’t wait to share the experience!  I wish we had more time to run in Flagstaff but there is always another time to explore!   If you have any questions about our trip feel free to reach out!

The storm moving out of the canyon
Antelope Canyon

Trail Running the White Mountains

Have you ever wondered what it is like running in the White Mountains of New Hampshire?

I might be biased but living in the White Mountains is nothing short of incredible!  I have been to many places and the only place even remotely close to the trails and mountains in the Whites is Alaska.  If you want to experience the hardest terrain in the country then you need to visit New Hampshire and check out our mountains!

Fun photo shoot with Philbrick photography in the presidential range
Fun photo shoot with Philbrick photography in the presidential range
What are the trails like?  What kind of scary animals do you need to watch out for?  Can you camp?  Are there any races in the White Mountains?

The trails are loaded with rocks.  Honestly, you will be speed hiking most of it and as a result you really should not attempt to actually run the White Mountains until you are comfortable running on technical trails.  I started out by hiking the Whites and eventually transitioned to running them.  The weather is unpredictable and the trails are very rugged and remote.  Plan on the miles ticking by much slower than you are used to.

New Hampshire has bear, rare mountain lion sightings, moose (which are more dangerous than bear), black flies, mosquitos, deer flies and porcupine (more of a hazard for your curious pup)

Camping in the White Mountains is plentiful and most campgrounds are run by the Forest Service.  There are pay huts, shelters and platforms in the mountains but be sure to research them as some will require you to make a reservation or pay to stay.  There are camping rules that can be found at the White Mountain National Forest website.

The terrain in the White Mountains is very rugged

There are some great races in the White Mountains and if the runners can help to keep the trails clean during the race and be respectful to hikers there will be more!  Right now these are a few of the trail races in the White Mountains.  They are all wicked fun and well organized!

Mount Chocorua Race-   14 mile course with a mix of smooth single track, steep slabs, slippery rocks, significant elevation gain,  and killer views from the summit!

Kilkenny Ridge Race-a 26 mile traverse across the Kilkenny ridge which brings you to the top of two New Hampshire 4000 foot mountains.  There is a 50 mile distance that will be an out and back on the ridge.  A great mix of technical trails, great single track, summit views and beautiful forest!

Some of the trails have ladders and bridges

Randolph Ramble-a 10 kilometer-long, rugged, self-supported trail race through the Great North Woods in the mountain town of Randolph, New Hampshire, at the base of the Northern Presidentials.

Kismet Cliff Run- a five-mile race that navigates the rollercoaster trails of Cathedral and Whitehorse Ledges. A great mix of single track and double track with great views of Cathedral ledge and Echo Lake.  There is also a half marathon that takes you over North Moat Mountain which offers incredible views and strenuous climbing!

White Lake Ultras – A 6, 12, and 24 hour loop course around White Lake.  Not very techical but the 2.4 mile loop is very scenic and fun!  Camping right at the start/finish.

Cranmore Mountain Race-This race offers great single track, ski trails and a very well organized event!  It is about 6.2 miles long.

Loon Mountain race-Although this is not a technical course it is extremely steep and challenging with the Upper Walking Boss being the crux of the race.  The course is 6.6 miles long.  The views are incredible and it also serves as the mountain running championship race.

Some of the great views the White Mountains have to offer!
The snowfield on Jefferson
Is it expensive?  Do you need special gear?  What are the rules regarding dogs, trash, navigation in the White Mountains?  Do you need permits?

New Hampshire is not very expensive to visit and there are many great places to get food and drinks.  Our economy thrives on tourism so please visit the small local businesses!   One of our favorites is Delaneys in North Conway because they serve food until 11pm, have awesome American style food and drinks and have incredible sushi! You can’t go wrong with so many places to pick from!  Check out Peaches for breakfast, it is small but has wonderful breakfast food in a quaint setting!

The pups on the summit of Mount Chocorua
Pups love the mountains!

You do not need special gear to run the mountains but you will want to carry more than you think you need.  Plan to move around 2-3 miles an hour.  3-4mph is considered fast.  Be respectful of hikers and always be a good ambassador!  Most people will cheer you on and let you by if you are polite and give them plenty of notice that you are coming up on them.

Some of the more runnable terrain on Franconia Ridge
Clouds over the mountains

I think the La Sportiva Akyra is the best shoe for the White Mountains.  They offer killer traction and cushion.  You want to have good traction.  The rocks can be very slippery!  I always carry a windbreaker with me and a light pair of gloves and a light hat.  I have been in a snowstorm in the summer!  It can be 80 degrees down low and 30 up high, if a thunderstorm creeps up on you there may even be hail.

You may want to cary a space blanket.  Two liters of water is wise and a filter or life straw. I love the MSR Trail Shot! There are some great lightweight filters out there!  Most water crossings are on maps but some routes can be very dry in the summer with very little to filter.  I carry a mid size running pack in the summer and a bigger one in the winter.

Winter can be a challenge with water.  Most water sources are frozen and bottles or packs can freeze.  We use a Platypus to hold water inside our packs and place it against our back to keep it from freezing.

Huntingtons Ravine

In the winter you will want a puffy jacket, hand warmers, warm mittens and hat and possibly an extra layer.  Carry more food than you think you need.  The huts have water and you can buy treats which can make you happy on a hot day or if you run out of food!  Bring cash.  The huts operate on a seasonal schedule so be sure to check to see if they are open.

There are no leash laws in the White Mountains–IF–your dog is friendly and under voice command.  Please leave your aggressive dogs at home or on a leash.  This has been an issue in recent years.  Most of the locals have very well behaved trail dogs and we don’t want to lose the privilege of them being able to enjoy mountain adventures with us.  Be sure to visit the dog bakery at Four Your Paws only which is by far the best pet store ever, plus it is locally owned and operated!  Celebrate your pups birthday there too, they will spoil your dog!

Dog Friendly Hiking Trails in New Hampshire. Unlike most states, New Hampshire allows dogs in its major national forest, the White Mountain National Forest. However, they must be under verbal command or restrained at all times. … Dogs are also allowed in most state parks, though not at picnic areas or beaches.

Going up Mount Chocorua
Are maps important?

You should always carry a map.   If you plan on going above treeline it helps with finding bail out routes during bad storms or white out conditions.

The White Mountains live by a Leave No Trace Ethic.  Please pack out everything including food scraps.  There has been an issue over the last few years with trash and feces with toilet paper/baby wipes on the trail.  Nobody needs to see that and the forest service is overwhelmed with trying to clean up the mess.  If you have to relieve yourself and need to know the rules follow this link.

You do not need permits but most trail heads require a parking pass which can be paid at the lot by cash or check.   You can buy a season pass or you can get a week pass.  

Above treeline in the clouds
This is a pretty standard trail in the White Mountains
What is the Hike Safe Card?  Are the mountains dangerous?  Where can I find out about trail conditions and weather?

The Hike Safe Card is an affordable rescue insurance plan that you can buy.  This is not going to cover being wreckless or negligence.  You still need to carry the appropriate gear, adequate food and water, a map, etc.  Cell phones do not work in most of the Whites so do not depend on that either.

You should never plan on a rescue and your goal should always be to get yourself out of a situation on your own.  There are many organizations in New Hampshire that teach mountain skills and if you are not comfortable venturing into the mountains yet take a course!  Remember each rescuer is a volunteer.  The Forest Service is under funded and can’t afford to keep up with the number of rescues they have had to deal with over the last few years.  Just be safe and take care of yourself and you will be fine!

The Mountains are beautiful!

There are some wonderful places to check the trail conditions and the weather.  Here are my favorite websites:

New England Trail Conditions: hikers and runners post trail conditions here all the time!

NOAA Recreational Forecast:Short term detailed forecast for various elevations.  Great for deciding which mountains to do based on winds, clouds and overall weather.

Higher Summits Forecast: This is perfect for the short term weather forecast on the higher summits.  Best for summits over 5000 feet!

See the Northern Lights: Yes, you can see the northern lights in New Hampshire!  The best times to see them are from late March-April and August-September

Philbrick Photography captured a 26 year long dream of mine on film! Northern lights in Jackson, NH
Best time to visit New Hampshire

The best time to visit New Hampshire is during the winter or summer.  The shoulder seasons can be very icy and the mountains can hold onto the snow even into June and the snow and ice can start in September.  There are only a couple of campgrounds open in the winter and many to choose from in the summer.

Mount Chocorua

You should put a trip to the White Mountains on your bucket list!  The trail races are a great way to follow a marked trail with aid stations so we hope you can come experience what the White Mountains have to offer!

It is so beautiful above treeline

 

Destination running

Ever since my first trip out west in 1997 I have loved traveling.  I love to explore new places that require me to use my body to get there.  It doesn’t matter if it involves mountaineering, hiking, mountain biking or trail running.  Getting out into the wilderness makes me so very happy!  It is so fun to see new critters, plant life, different rocks and dirt, different climates and colors!  It also allows me to take a break from our fast paced and social media based world.

Arikok running
Arikok running

I have been trying to figure out what method of social media I prefer.  I gave up blogging to do more Facebook and Instagram and found that Facebook is really not for me.  In an effort to simplify my life I am choosing to return to blogging and to use Instagram -@dangergirldh – to share photos of my adventures.

Ryan taking in the views
Iguana!

Last week I went to Aruba with Ryan for a quick escape from the very long New Hampshire winters.  This winter has been incredible since taking up skimo racing!  I have been snowboarding for over 20 years and learning to ski down a hill is challenging but one day I will be good at it!  Skiing up a hill though, that is totally addicting!

Photo by Cait Bourgault during Wild Corn Skimo race
Photo by Erik Howes during the wild corn skimo race

Have you trail run in Aruba?  Have you ever wondered what the trails are like?  Did you even know that trails do exist there?  Well, they do and they offer everything from technical singletrack to buttery smooth jeep roads!

Ryan running by the ocean
Running from the California Lighthouse

The wildlife on the island is pretty low key with the rattlesnake being labeled as the top of the food chain in Aruba.  There were very few bugs the first week of April which was nice.  We saw donkeys, goats, lizards, iguanas, rabbits and there are bats.  They all seemed to leave us alone except for an Iguana at the beach checking out backpacks for food.

Pretty views of the ocean from up high!

Arikok national forest will cost you $11 per person to visit but there are many single track and double track trails that will take you up and over the highest peaks on the island and down to the ocean.  The maps are not accurate and there are many unmarked trails.  Most of the trails are not signed but have 4×4 wood poles with various colored stripes to mark the trails.  You will encounter cacti, divi trees and many plants with sharp prickers.  The island is mostly desert so expect it to be very dry.  Bring plenty of water because there is no shade and it is very hot!

Trails in Arikok
Trail in Arikok

Mount Jamanota, the highest point on the island is 189 meters high. It is pretty easy to navigate by sight so we were able to figure out which trails to take to the summit.  Mount Hooiberg which is not in Arikok but instead sits in a neighborhood is worth checking out.  It is only .2 miles from the parking lot to the summit and there are stairs that will take you to the summit which sits at 165 meters.  There are about 563 stairs that will take you to the summit which offers views of most of the island.  You will gain about 300 feet of elevation in .2 miles.

Hooiberg stairs to summit
Summit of Hooiberg

There were more trails by the California Lighthouse which consisted of dirt jeep roads that were quite flat and ran along the ocean but there were also many mountain bike single track trails that branched off of the jeep roads!  They were technical and on very rolling terrain.

Ryan running jeep roads

There is no camping on the island and most hotels are very large with very nice pools.  There was not much of a nightlife on the island when we went.  The majority of the people there were families with small children and elderly people.  The restaurants were all very good and the bars were fun (there were many pool bars) but the drinks were very weak.

 

Pool bar!
Pool Bar!

The beaches are all very clean and the water was a great place to cool off from the heat.  It was almost 90 degrees every day.  The water was very clear and the snorkeling offered some wonderful fish sightings with so many brightly colored ones swimming around!  There are strong currents in Aruba so stay close to shore if you are not a strong swimmer and even being a strong swimmer I did not feel comfortable with how pushy some of the snorkeling areas were. Baby beach was our favorite place to snorkel and if you go there be sure to get a drink and bite to eat at Big Mammas!  They made the best drinks on the island!

In front of Pure Ocean
By the Pier

Expect to pay between $20-$40 USD for your meals.  Drinks start at about $8.  Most appetizers started at $12.  Make reservations for any dinner you plan to have on the beach.  They have some incredible beach side dining that typically starts at 6pm but you are possibly not going to get a table if you do not have a reservation.

 

Crazy road in Arikok

You do not need to have a car but it really came in handy when trying to see the whole island.  There are many places that a car is tough to take through so it may be worth spending the extra money on the jeep if you are not comfortable on backcountry roads in a small car.  They also had many jeep and four wheeler tours which allow you to see a lot of the island.  We enjoyed seeing a bit less but trekking off the beaten path and seeing about 3 people during our ten mile run.

Snorkeling
Malmok snorkeling

Flying to Aruba from Boston is easy.  We took direct flights on Jet Blue which allowed us to fly out early and be on the island by noon and our flight out was not until 4pm so we got to do some stuff in the morning.  Most hotels will allow you to check out at noon which is plenty of time because you will need to be at the airport 3 hours prior to you departure.  Traffic is crazy so plan accordingly so you can be at the airport in time.  Customs is slow and takes a lot of patience to get through so eat up before you go.

Crazy swamp with cool birds
Swamp with cool birds

I would recommend Aruba for a trail running adventure.  It is very safe and not once did we feel worried about our safety.  Obviously avoid shady neighborhoods at night.  We found the locals to be either very friendly or very rude so just smile and be nice.  There were a lot of very rude tourists so I am sure some of the locals are tired of  mean people.

 

Trails in the desert

My La Sportiva Lycan shoes were awesome for the varied terrain in Aruba.  I wore my Julbo Aerolite sunglasses with Zebra Lenses which were perfect in the bright sun.  My La Sportiva clothing wicked away my sweat and helped keep me comfortable with zero chaffing!

If you have any questions about traveling to Aruba for some running feel free to reach out and I will do the best I can to help you plan your trip! kfolcik2@gmail.com

Happy running!

Running in my Lycans and Sportiva clothing!